Hiking For Families – Upcoming Presentation

This family is extremely fertile.

This family is extremely fertile.

Isn’t that family cute?

Bring your cute family this Saturday to the North Mountain Visitor Center where I’ll be presenting my list of recommended trails in the area that are great for families.

Family Hiking by Lilia Menconi

Saturday, March 7, 9:30 a.m.

North Mountain Visitor Center: 12950 N 7th St, Phoenix, AZ 85029

After the presentation, be sure to stick around for a chance to meet other local authors. I’ll have books available for sale and signing. Hope to see you there!

Maternity Hike: Trail 100/101 to North Mountain

These trails have existed for a long time but this combination was new to me!

These trails have existed for a long time but this combination was new to me!

With the limited energy, small bladder, and cardio deficiency I’m experiencing during this pregnancy, I’ve been on the hunt for trails under three miles that still offer a little bit of climbing.

Oh, and if there’s a bathroom at the trailhead, that’s a sure-fire winner.

The Phoenix Mountains Preserve just keeps delivering. Armed with my Green Trails Map, I’m having a blast scouting out “new” trails (combinations I haven’t yet explored) and then heading out for a new adventure.

My newest adventure once again taps the main artery of the Phoenix Mountains Preserve: Trail 100.

When Trail 101 meets the North Mountain summit trail (Trail 44 - paved), the maternity hike is over. But the non-maternity hike can keep going!

When Trail 101 meets the North Mountain summit trail (Trail 44 – paved), the maternity hike is over. But the non-maternity hike can keep going!

This one begins in a popular area near the North Mountain Visitor Center, passes by Shaw Butte to the west, then follows a little-known trail on the north side of North Mountain. This quiet area is a nice respite from the hustle and bustle of the surrounding popular trails. The hike ends at the intersection with the North Mountain Summit Trail. And aside from the yellow flags indicating sites where irresponsible hikers left their dog’s waste (oh, come ON, people!) the hike was glorious on a breezy spring day.

See how it all fits together? You could make all kinds of delicious trail combinations yum yum!

See how it all fits together? You could make all kinds of delicious trail combinations yum yum!

Trail 100/101 to North Mountain

Distance: 2.4 miles

Elevation Gain: 225 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pregnancy Difficulty: Moderate

Location: North Mountain Visitor Center (North Mountain/Shaw Butte) in Phoenix Mountains Preserve

Online Map & Driving Directions (click the link and scroll to bottom of page for Google map driving directions)

Description:

To start the hike, find the signs to Trail 100 on the south side of the North Mountain Visitor Center building. Head west along Trail 100. At 0.3 mile, Trail 100 and Trail 306 combine and you’ll follow the shared trail south. When you encounter a small clearing with a bench (at 0.6 mile total), see the trail marker for Trail 101. Hang a left to follow Trail 101 southeast to start a subtle ascent that slowly intensifies.

At about 1.1 mile total, you have an elevated view of 7th Street below. Turn right to continue along Trail 101 following the correct trail signs (do NOT take the trail that heads north as it is clearly signed as a closed area). You’ll continue to climb until you reach the paved road that marks the intersection with Trail 44 (North Mountain Summit Trail) at 1.2 miles. Turn around here and enjoy your descent as you retrace your steps to the North Mountain Visitor Center for a total of 2.4 miles.

Option for non-pregnant people: Instead of turning around, take Trail 44 to the summit of North Mountain! This will add 350 feet (give or take) in just 0.7 mile on the way up. The trail is wide, paved, and easy to follow to the summit which is littered with large, metal towers. You’ll certainly get a FINE workout from this addition that creates a total hike of 3.8 miles with 575 feet of elevation gain. Just don’t forget to turn off of Trail 44 to return to Trail 101 on the way down!

Like this? Want more? Buy my book!

Obligatory disclaimer for the pregnant ladies and all other humans: Check with your doctor before engaging in exercise.

My First Full Moon Hike

Hiking by moonlight is my new favorite thing!

Hiking by moonlight is my new favorite thing!

If you haven’t experienced a full moon hike, OHMYGOD do it!

I can’t believe it took so long for me to try this out!

(That’s sort of a lie, actually. I can totally believe it because I’m a nervous ninny. I have an overactive and morbid imagination [which I wrote about here] so when considering moonlit hikes in the past, I always came up with excellent anxieties that ultimately led to my decision to stay home. What if we’re breaking the law and we get arrested and then a local newspaper writes a story about the hiking book author that broke the law while on the trail? What if I trip, tumble down the mountain, break my leg, then start hearing the narration from I Shouldn’t Be Alive in my head? What if dangerous drug dealers/psychopaths/rapists hide out on the trail at night and we run into them and then they shoot Lou/throw me in a van for God knows what/ignore my rape whistle and rape me anyway?

You would think that the many ranger-led moonlit group hikes scheduled at the Maricopa Regional Parks would be good options for me. But I have one for that, too: What if a stranger strikes up a conversation with me and I say something stupid and then things get awkward?  Boom. Just like that. I’m staying home.)

Anyyywaaaaaayyyyy, last week on a full moon night, Lou calmed my fears and we hiked North Mountain.

This was new to the both of us. As we strapped on headlamps and laced up in the parking lot, we kept glancing at the shadowed silhouette of the mountain.

We’ve hiked North Mountain about 500 times but at night, it looked completely alien. We preferred to keep our headlamps off so we could soak up the moonlight. Sure, I caught a toe here and there on an unexpected dip in the wide trail (it’s an access road) but for the most part, my feet were confident.

Instagram in the night! You can barely see Lou on the lower right corner.

Instagram in the night! You can barely see Lou on the lower right corner.

Good thing — I was so distracted by the moonlit sights, I hardly watched my feet. The rocks cascaded new shadows, the surrounding desert plant-life carved mysterious silhouettes, and I noticed small peaks or ridges I had ignored before. And, of course, I saw the lights of the entire city sparkling in all directions. The only thing blocking out the sea of glitter were the surrounding mountains that had lost their depth in the darkness and looked like cardboard cutouts.

I admit it. I was moved.

We weren’t the only ones discovering this darkened desert. We ran into a handful of other hikers in the moonlight. As always, the people on the trail were polite and cheerful (and not rape-y at all!).

And though I’m not yet brave enough to try a rocky or narrow trail, Lou and I are officially hooked. I’ve got my heart set on Shaw Butte for our next full moon hike.

I’d love to hear more trail suggestions!

Vintage Take a Hike Phoenix

Do you follow Vintage Phoenix?

Oh, you should, you should!

They are almost solely responsible for my ability to compile the following images that constitute this blog post. These vintage postcards and photos show landmarks, mountains, and parks that are featured in my book, Take a Hike Phoenix.

North Mountain (Page 46 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1951 (Hatcher and Central)

1951 (Hatcher and Central)

Piestewa Peak (Pages 59-70 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

119??

19??

19??

19??

1930s (Arizona Biltmore)

1930s (Arizona Biltmore)

Camelback Mountain (Pages 75 & 78 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1920s

1920s

1960s (Thomas Mall)

1960s (Thomas Mall)

19??

19??

1970s

1970s

Arizona Falls (Page 81 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

Arizona Falls c.1900

Arizona Falls c.1900

Hole in the Rock (Page 84 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1907

1907

1940s

1940s

Papago Park (Page 87 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1920s

1920s

1934 (Amphitheater)

1934 (Amphitheater)

1950s

1950s

Hayden Butte aka A Mountain (Page 90 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1880s

1880s

1950s

1950s

1975

1975

South Mountain (Pages 125-144 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1960s

1960s

Holbert Trail to Dobbins Lookout in South Mountain (Page 134 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1940s

1940s

Saguaro Lake, Butcher Jones Trail (Page 162 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

1957

1957

Weaver’s Needle, Peralta Trail to Fremont Saddle (Page 195 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

19??

19??

Superstition Mountains (Pages 185-204 in Take a Hike Phoenix)

19??

19??

19??

19??

Neat, right?

The Hike That Makes Me Want to Have a Baby

Check out photos, gps information, and other details of  this trail on my Everytrail.com site. My book, Take a Hike Phoenix, is hitting bookstores November 19th and is now available for pre-order at barnesandnoble.com or amazon.com.

This makes me want to get pregnant.

This makes me want to get pregnant.

Every trail in this town has a unique and personal meaning to me.

As I’m sure you know by now, the Quartz Ridge Trail 8A turns me into a sentimental fool (as evidenced from this post in which I got super gushy over my dear friend Kristina).

The North Mountain National Trail 44, however, makes me want to get pregnant…and possibly buy a dog.

That’s because this trail is filled with families. Families with toddlers, tweens, and adolescents climbing the wide, paved access road that constitutes most of the trail. With the families come the dogs and I’m often cooing over the chihuahuas, Labradors, and baby pit bulls. Sleeping babies are frequently seen with Mom laboriously pushing the stroller up the merciless incline. And we usually spy an old couple holding hands as they shuffle their way to the summit.

On this short trail that has zero flat parts, we’re all flushed and sweaty as we huff our way up the mountain. To see so many people turning this shared struggle into a family event is, well, it’s just nice.

As a rule, I admire anyone (no matter their age, size, or hiking shoe choice) who hits a trail. Especially this trail…it may be short but, man, it can hurt if you’re having an off day.

We climbed up to the summit the other night after a rainy day and the place was packed with the usual suspects. And just as I do every time I hike this trail, I imagined myself as the new mom shedding off the baby weight, the proud parent watching their energetic 9-year-old jog ahead like it’s nothing (seriously, how do they do that?), and the wrinkly old lady hiking with her wrinkly old husband.

It’s reassuring. Especially at a time when women my age fear losing so much with marriage and family (independence, career, identity, exercise, and hot rockin’ body), it’s nice to know there’s a trail that’s waiting for me — no matter which stage of life I’m in.